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World Series Moments

Sports | By The Top 13 on November 4, 2009

With Game 6 of this year's Fall Classic scheduled for this evening, The Top 13 takes a look at The Top 13 World Series Moments. Not surprisingly, neither team playing tonight is a stranger to great moments in World Series history. Indeed, the Bronx Bombers lead the way with four appearances in The Top 13. Fans of the Phillies surely are hoping their team avoids the fate it suffered in its sole appearance on this list.

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Don Larsen's Perfect Game

1

Don Larsen's Perfect Game

1956, Game 5: Yankees 2, Dodgers 0

The series was tied 2-2 when Larsen took the hill for the Yankees in Game 5 of this subway series. Larsen, who couldn't get out of the second inning in an earlier start in the series, proceeded to do what no one had ever done before or has done since. Larsen threw a perfect game, retiring all 27 Dodgers in order. The Yankees went on to win the series in seven games.

Joe Carter's Series-Winning Home Run

2

Joe Carter's Series-Winning Home Run

1993, Game 6: Blue Jays 8, Phillies 6

With one out and two runners on, Carter stepped to the plate in the bottom of the ninth of Game 6 with the Blue Jays facing a two-run deficit and Phillies closer Mitch Williams on the hill. A deciding Game 7 appeared likely to stand in the way of the Blue Jays bid to win back-to-back world championships. Instead, Carter sent the Skydome into delirium as he launched an inside slider into the left field seats for the walk-off series clincher. At the time, Carter's home run was just the second in history to end a World Series.

Rivera Blows a Save

3

Rivera Blows a Save

2001, Game 7: Diamondbacks 3, Yankees 2

The Yankees had won three straight World Series titles. Mariano Rivera had converted 22 straight post-season save opportunities. No team had ever come back to win a Game 7 of the World Series in the bottom of the ninth inning. So what do you think happened when Rivera took the mound in the bottom of the ninth inning with 2-1 lead? He blew it. The Diamondbacks only had one hard hit ball (a double by Tony Womack), but two weak singles and a Rivera throwing error sealed the Yankees' fate.

Bill Mazeroski's Game-Winning Home Run

4

Bill Mazeroski's Game-Winning Home Run

1960, Game 7: Pirates 10, Yankees 9

The Yankees were heavily favored against the Pirates and scored more than twice as many runs than the Pirates during the series. Nevertheless, the Yankees and Pirates entered the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 at Forbes Field tied 9-9. That was when Mazeroski, considered by many to be the greatest fielding second basemen of all time, launched a one-out offering from Ralph Terry into the seats for a series-winning home run.

Carlton Fisk's Home Run

5

Carlton Fisk's Home Run

1975, Game 6: Red Sox 7, Reds 6

With the Red Sox trailing the series 3-2 and the game tied at 6 in the bottom of the 12th inning, Fisk led off and ripped Pat Darcy's first offering down the left-field line. If it stayed fair, it was gone, and Fisk did everything he could to make sure it was, wildly waving his hands to will the ball fair. Most people forget that the Red Sox ultimately lost the series. That's because Fisk's Game 6 heroics capped off what many believe to be one of the greatest World Series games ever played and provided one of the most indelible images in baseball history.

Kirk Gibson Game-Winning Home Run

6

Kirk Gibson Game-Winning Home Run

1988, Game 1: Dodgers 5, Athletics 4

The Dodgers entered the bottom of the ninth in the series opener trailing 4-3 against the heavily favored A's. With two outs and a runner on first, the conventional wisdom had the game's best reliever, Dennis Eckersley, finishing the Dodgers off. Instead, Gibson, who was supposed to be out for the series with a bum knee, stepped up to the plate as a pinch hitter. Gibson worked the count full before launching an Eckersley offering into the right-field seats for the walk-off win. After limping around the bases, Gibson didn't play again in the series. But the big hit propelled the Dodgers to a five-game series win.

Reggie Jackson Hits Three Home Runs

7

Reggie Jackson Hits Three Home Runs

1977, Game 6: Yankees 8, Dodgers 4

Twenty-one years after Larsen pitched his perfect game, the Yankees and Dodgers resumed their Fall Classic rivalry. Up 3-2 in the series, the Yankees returned to the Bronx looking to finish off their first championship season in 15 years. Mr. October single-handedly made sure the Yankees would not be denied, clubbing home runs in three straight at bats to become the only player other than Babe Ruth to hit three long balls in a single World Series game.

Willie Mays' Catch

8

Willie Mays' Catch

1954, Game 1: Giants 5, Indians 2

Another Game 1 miracle, Mays made his famous over-the-shoulder catch with no outs in the eighth inning of a tie game with two runners on base. Indians outfielder Vic Wertz drove the ball at least 450 feet to dead center in the gigantic Polo Grounds, but Mays caught it on a dead sprint and later claimed he "had it the whole time." The Giants squeezed out of the jam, won the game in extra innings, and ultimately swept the series.

Enos Slaughter's Mad Dash

9

Enos Slaughter's Mad Dash

1946, Game 7: Cardinals 4, Red Sox 3

Another Red Sox heartbreaker. Tied 3-3 in the bottom of the eighth inning of the series' deciding game, future Hall of Famer Enos Slaughter scored all the way from first base on a double (that most observers believe should have been ruled a single) off the bat of Harry Walker. Slaughter took off with the pitch and ran through his third base coach's stop sign en route to the winning run of the game and series.

Jack Morris' Ten-Inning Shutout

10

Jack Morris' Ten-Inning Shutout

1991, Game 7: Twins 1, Braves 0

Making his third start of the series, Jack Morris simply outlasted the Braves. He pitched masterfully, working his way out of trouble several times on his way to a complete game ten-inning, series clinching shutout. As Sports Illustrated noted, on that night, Morris "would have outlasted Methuselah." The Twins' victory marked the first time in nearly 70 years that the World Series ended with an extra-inning seventh-game, and the teams played more innings (69) than were played in any previous seven-game World Series.

Bill Buckner's Error

11

Bill Buckner's Error

1986, Game 6: Mets 6, Red Sox 5

The Red Sox appeared ready to exorcise the long-standing curse that had plagued the franchise when they took a 3-2 lead over the Mets in their best of seven series. With the scored tied at 5 in the bottom of the 10th inning in Game 6, Red Sox first basemen Bill Buckner allowed a Mookie Wilson grounder to pass through his legs, scoring Ray Knight and tying the series. The Mets won the next game and the Red Sox curse continued for nearly 20 more years. Buckner's error remains the most memorable in World Series history.

Jorge Orta's Called Safe

12

Jorge Orta's Called Safe

1985, Game 6: Royals 2, Cardinals 1

The Cardinals were up 1-0 and only three outs away from winning the World Series against their in-state rival when Cardinals closer Todd Worrell got Jorge Orta to lead off the bottom of the ninth with a routine ground ball to first-basemen Jack Clark, who tossed the ball to Worrell for what appeared to be the first out. There has never been any question that umpire Don Denkinger blew the call by calling Orta safe. But the Cardinals simply could not recover. The Royals plated two runs to win Game 6, and then Bret Saberhagen shut out the Cardinals, 11-0, to close out the series.

Shoeless Joe Makes the Final Out

13

Shoeless Joe Makes the Final Out

1919, Game 8: Reds 10, White Sox 5

One of the most famous World Series of all-time, the 1919 series ended with a whimper when Shoeless Joe Jackson grounded out to second with two runners on base. Jackson led all hitters, batting .375 during the eight-game series, and he had homered in the third inning of that final game. But Jackson’s seemingly healthy offensive numbers obscured the truth – that member of the White Sox had conspired with gamblers to throw several games of the World Series. Jackson's conduct led to his permanent banishment from the game.

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Comments Leave a comment

jasun 

Going by sheer "moments" in the world series, I would rank Gibson's HR WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY higher than Mariano blowing a save.
In fact, I would rank pretty much all of these over Mariano blowing a save.

8:12 AM   Nov 04, 2009

jasun 

Though i guess it was pretty big.
I just feel like there were huge moments all over that series and the blown save at the end of game 7 was just another big moment in a series full of them.

I really can't think of anything that has been left off this list though.

8:15 AM   Nov 04, 2009

jason ★★

I dunno, I think that blown save was a pretty big moment. It decided the series and ended the Yankees' then-dynasty rather suddenly. It also is one of the few examples of Rivera -- one of the greatest pitchers in postseason history -- being mortal. It was one of the most exciting baseball moments I've witnessed, and I wasn't rooting for either team. You're right though, there were other big moments, like the Byung-Hyun Kim meltdowns in NY. Gibson's HR was a great moment, but it was in game 1 of the series.

8:24 AM   Nov 04, 2009

jasun 

Yeah, that is pretty much why I made the second post. I didn't mean to undervalue it as much as it seemed I was doing.

8:28 AM   Nov 04, 2009

KungFuJay ★★

Fuck Don Denkinger.

9:30 AM   Nov 04, 2009

brian 

Come on, KungFuJay, the Cardinals have 10 titles; that was the Royals' only one.

9:46 AM   Nov 04, 2009

KungFuJay ★★

And it's a tainted one at that.

9:57 AM   Nov 04, 2009

nizz 

Don't remind me.
Fucking Jack Morris.

12:11 PM   Nov 04, 2009

stupka 

The omission of Kirby Puckett's HR in extra innings of game 6 of the 91 world series is disturbing.

9:30 PM   Dec 31, 2010

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